Cloud Security Alliance Poll: NSA’s PRISM Seriously Bad for U.S. Cloud Providers

Obey-surveillance

The Cloud Security Alliance, a non-profit organization with more than 45,000 individual members including big-time enterprise support, has recently put a thermometer out to measure the effects of the PRISM program on cloud usage in the form of a poll. From approximately 500 responses (about half from members outside of the U.S.) the results revealed that the effect of the PRISM program on cloud computing usage could shift usage patterns. Some results of the poll:

  • 10% of its non-US members have cancelled a contract with a US based cloud provider
  • 56% said they were less likely to use an American company
  • 36% of US firms polled said the revelations would make it more difficult for their company to do business outside the United States, while 64 percent said it would not.
  • 91% of members surveyed said companies should be allowed to publish summary information about data they provide to the National Security Agency or other US government entities.


Past reactions over the Patriot Act, and the claims that it would affect cloud computing usage, sales, and relationships seemed like a fear mongers’ marketing dream. However, the public nature of the Act and the transparency to scrutinize over its language reduced some of the impact. The NSA’s PRISM program, and its shady development molded by U.S. big Corporation and Government has taken the incendiary material from that initial blow and jammed it into a powder keg that was never meant to see the light of day, and the extent of damaged trust and relations might be irreparable. Its effect on global cloud providers will be watched closely.

In the World of PaaS:

dotCloud New CEO, Former President of Gluster

Ben Golub, who previously ran Gluster and was part of its sale to Red Hat in 2011 has his vision set for his new role at dotCloud. He’s confident too, saying that, “Operators both inside and outside of the enterprise want to be able to run applications seamlessly. Almost every enterprise wants its own PaaS-like environment.” The multi-language PaaS is now looking to push out its boundaries, not just supporting multiple languages but also multiple stacks and wide-ranging hardware support to meet this need. Ben continued saying, “…the industry seems to want not just a multi-language PaaS, but a limitless-language, multi-environment, and multi-enterprise PaaS.”

CloudBees acquires Irish Data Sync App Fox-Weave

Java PaaS mainstay CloudBees has just announced the acquisition of Fox-Weave, an Irish data integration company looking to enable sync and migration of data across disparate APIs. CloudBees CEO Tom Fennelly had this to say on the acquisition, “APIs are driving a new economy and a new wave of innovation. With FoxWeave, CloudBees is going to make it easier for PaaS application developers to consume these APIs in intuitive and maintainable ways.”

Good News at VMware’s Earnings Call

In the world of VMware, earnings were up 28% YOY for the 2nd Quarter of 2013, beating analysts’ expectations – but CEO Pat Gelsinger ignored an elephant in the room at their earnings call. According to GigaOM’s Barb Darrow, a brain drain of top talent on their IaaS products is too big to ignore, and warrants scrutiny of the virtualization giant and its roadmap.