Cloud For BusinessCloud computing may be everyone’s favorite new buzzword, but the cloud isn’t necessarily for everyone. Though there are small advantages to be had by everyone through the intelligent utilization of cloud services, some businesses are better positioned to benefit from the technology than others. How do you know if your organization is among them?

Simple: there are certain traits which effectively make a decision to use the cloud a no-brainer.  If you notice the presence of one or more of these qualities in your organization, then a move to the cloud would be a wise one, indeed.

It’s relatively small and/or new, with little to no infrastructure of its own

For a smaller organization or a business just getting on its feet, the cloud can be a godsend. Many small businesses don’t necessarily have the budget or the IT expertise to manage their own servers. Because of this, the service offered by cloud vendors – which is provided on-demand, with a flat rate and no upfront free – is an ideal choice when pitted against buying and operating one’s own systems.

It offers an online service which experiences frequent, unpredictable spikes in traffic

The ability to quickly and easily deploy new instances may well be one of the greatest strengths of the cloud.  Because of this scalability, the cloud is perfect for an organization that experiences frequent and significant traffic spikes. Rather than having to set up and manage new hardware in order to deal with increased demand – which, depending on the size of the spikes, may not necessarily be sufficient – a business can instead simply provision more resources from their cloud vendor.

Additionally, the organization will only need to pay for those resources they provision: vendors do not charge their clients for resources they don’t use.

A great deal of rapid growth is expected in the near future

Similarly to traffic spikes, a cloud solution is well-suited to deal with rapid organizational growth. Should an organization expect to rapidly expand their infrastructure – either due to hiring an influx of new employees or bringing in a flood of new customers – the cloud can provide the necessary resources to support the change. This can be done either permanently or on a temporary basis, until new infrastructure can be connected to deal with the increased server load.

It employs a highly mobile workforce

If a business’s employees have a tendency to work out of the office, either on the road or from home, then a cloud environment might be exactly what that business needs. Setting up the necessary applications and systems with cloud access means that so long as staff members have Internet access, they can do their jobs. This could potentially improve efficiency across the board if employees have the desire to telecommute.

It’s Looking To Go Green

Believe it or not, cloud computing is actually a fairly-environmentally friendly technology, at least when compared to a more traditional solution (operating one’s own data center). This is because in a cloud implementation, a business uses only resources they need. This in turn decreases that business’s carbon footprint by somewhere between 30% and 90%, depending on that business’s size.

In Closing

Cloud computing is currently the darling of the technology industry. In spite of all the praises being sung, however, an organization doesn’t automatically have to use the cloud. Certain businesses will benefit more from cloud services than others; these businesses all share certain traits which identify them as ideal clients and the cloud as an ideal choice.